Skip to content

Categories:

Post 3

We are presented with a weaker side of Gloucestor.  At first the play begins with Gloucestor being a man of importance, and as the play progresses we see the slow collapse of that image.  I feel that this scene provides the reader with that side of Gloucestor in which he is at his lowest point.  This scene does confuse me in the possibilities of Gloucestor really believing all that is happening to him.  I suppose that Gloucester “falling” into nothingness is suppose to be overlooked perhaps, I am just not sure how something like that can be shown and the audience is suppose to really believe Gloucestor does is oblivious to the whole situation. How does he not feel the wind through his body as he supposedly falls.  Perhaps it is suppose to express this mans insanity.  So the zone can be the intensity of insanity Gloucestor has.

Desiree Guzman

Posted in Uncategorized.


Post 2

I believe that both “Batter My Heart” and “Death Not Be Proud” are very powerful sonnets.  They each carry some type of contradiction within.  In “Death Not Be Proud” we are presented with a notion of death that contradicts itself.  Death is the result of death and it is compared to sleep which is just as pleasant. Death in the sonnet cannot feel like the winner because the creating of it was done by death itself.  In the sonnet “Batter My Heart” the ending lines, “Divorce me, untie, or break that knot again,/
Take me to you, imprison me, for I,/ Except you enthrall me, never shall be free, / Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me” we see how the heart refers to the object that hurts it.  The ending lines are similar to the ending lines of “Death Not Be Proud” because of the negativity in the tone.  The tone can be of defeat that in one case the heart and in the other death, neither have won the battle.

Desiree Guzman

Posted in Uncategorized.


Post 1

We have read many sonnets during this semester but the ones I have enjoyed more are those of Shakespeare. The reason I enjoy them more is because of their format. I like how the sonnets are each based within three different sections. The format of the sonnet also interests me, the way the sonnets seems to develop a problem and at the end with the last two lines everything is summed up and solved. One of my favorite Shakespeare sonnets is sonnet 130:

I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress when she walks treads on the ground.
And yet by heaven I think my love as rare,
As any she belied with false compare.

I love the way he speaks of his mistress and the way he speaks of her and how different she is from any other woman. The couplet at the end of this sonnet is a bit difficult to understand yet so simple. It completes the poem very well.

Desiree Guzman 

Posted in Uncategorized.


Poetic innovation

In the second half of term, we’ve talked about the ways in which a number of poets are innovators. Who to you seems the most compelling and interesting innovator among the poets we’ve read in the second half of the course, and why does he seem so?

Posted in Uncategorized.


Paradise Lost

Scholars have debated how compelling the case of the fallen angels is in Books I and II of Paradise Lost — specifically, they’ve often discussed the extent to which the fallen angels are transformed into romantic heroes. What do you think about the identity of the fallen angels? How would you characterize it? What moment or moments in Book I or II are most important in establishing that identity?

Posted in Uncategorized.


Post #3

“Death, be not proud” is reaching for thought or an answer. This is a holy sonnet about death and religion. In lines 3-4 there is talk about not being able to make anyone die. Death is a part of every religion. I feel Donne is only showing what the bright side of religion is and fails to show what real reality is like outside of belief. Yes you can make someone die but it is murder, which is a sin. So doing the opposite of what’s expected makes you wrong. Personally I believe you can drive a bus through the holes in religion but who am I to judge other peoples beliefs. In lines 13-14 he talks about eternal life and how after experiencing death we are awake forever in eternal life. Eternity is actually forever. There is actually a Curb your Enthuasim episode with Larry David that I think of when going over this concept. Larry David and his wife renew their vows and in them his wife wants to promise eternity with him. He is against it because it is actually forever. To promise someone eternity is actually having no escape. I think knowing that after death there is still eternity to walk through with no ending in near makes death more comfortable. Not for me. Knowing that my next life will be me doing everything all over but never having anything end is a crazy thought. Scary at most.

Posted in Uncategorized.


Post #2

In Shakespeares “King Lear” he has three daughters Cordelia, Goneril and Regan. I feel that one daughter out of the three got the most attention. That one being Cordelia. Not only in Shakespeares piece but also in our class discussions. Personally, I believe it makes King Lear look like he thinks woman are accepted but only a selected few. As we read on we learn that in fact Cordelia is the closest to him in terms of personality and ways of living out of the three daughters. Cordelia is founded to be stubborn and calm like her father, King Lear. Cordelia is the youngest of the three and refuses to participate in any nonsense. I believe Goneril has it the worst. She did nothing wrong and her father has wished such negative things upon her. Cordelia is my favorite out of the three because she almost calls her father out on hiding himself when she says “He hath ever but slendery known himself”. Its almost as if she is calling him out on him not being aware of himself, while his daughters know him better then he knows himself. Cordelia also says “You have begot me, bled me, loved me.” There she establishes public and private conflicts central to tragedy. Over all I feel King Lear was a good read and was in some ways a story about a monster behind closed doors.

Posted in Uncategorized.


Post #1

Wife of Bath is a classic simply because it is one of the few pieces written back then where the gender tables are turned. Men are punished and blamed for once, as apposed to woman being mistreated or unequal to men. Here is where karma comes in. My favorite part of this story is when the knight wonders off into the woods and approaches a group of woman that take him to the queen. In order the stay alive the knight has to marry a not so beautiful woman. Sometimes I wish that kind of marriage was forced in this day and age because some young males are quick to judge with a women’s first impression. The knight is left with a choice. It’s either a woman who isn’t something great to look at but will be loyal or someone who is good looking but will be unfaithful. The knight gave the woman he was with the option to choose for him and that was satisfying enough. It was just nice for once for her to be able to make such a decision. Eventually they have a happy marriage and the woman becomes loyal and obedient to her husband. I just enjoyed the fact that for once the decision was in the hands of a woman and not a man because to often it is the other way around.

Posted in Uncategorized.


Donne’s “Batter my heart” and “Death, be not proud”

Trace the line of thought in Donne’s Holy Sonnet “Batter my heart” or “Death, be not proud.” What is the poet saying, and what literary devices are important to the sonnet?

Posted in Uncategorized.


Donne

We talked about how spiritual longing and worldly, erotic longing — and the literary conventions for representing these — bleed into one another in Donne’s poetry. What to you is the most striking moment of this merging in the poetry we have read? Explain to us why it captures your attention.

Posted in Uncategorized.